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Search Results for: “resilience ”

Strengthening Storms

Hurricane strength is influenced by sea surface temperature. As sea surface temperatures rise the number of intense hurricanes is also expected to increase.

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Migrating Species

Many plant and animal species are being found further north and at higher elevations than previously observed. Rising temperatures, changing precipitation patterns and shifts in vegetation communities are changing the effective range and distribution of many native and agricultural species.

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Protected: Assessing Resilience

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Data-driven Planning – Grand Traverse Regional Land Conservancy

The Grand Traverse Regional Land Conservancy develops data-driven plans to support ecosystem resilience in the Great Lakes region.

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Altered Water Levels

Increasing temperatures have been observed to lead to reduced lake levels due to increased evaporation. Altered water levels can negatively impact people and the environment.

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Altered Precipitation

The amount, distribution and timing of precipitation events is changing. In general, precipitation events are occurring less frequently, but are more likely to be intense.

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Introducing Green Infrastructure for Coastal Resilience

Natural and nature-based green infrastructure practices can play a critical role in making coastal communities more resilient to natural hazards and climate change. In this introductory course, participants review fundamental concepts and examine various practices. Local speakers share their expertise and the ways these techniques have been integrated into local planning processes.

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Shifting Seasons

Shifting seasons mean spring arrives earlier, winters are shorter, and the number of freezing days is declining. These changes impact species and habitat.

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Acidification

Ocean acidification has been linked to the disturbance of food webs and changing species distributions. Together with other biogeochemical changes, increasing ocean acidification may compromise the health of marine ecosystems as well as negatively impact many ocean goods and services and the communities that rely on them.

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Rising Sea Levels

Already the average global sea level has risen by 8 inches in the past century. By the end of this century, average global sea level could rise an additional three feet or more. The ecological consequences of these changes include worsening coastal erosion, habitat destruction, and saltwater encroachment into freshwater environments.

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