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Search Results for: “resilience ”

Adapt Land Trust Practices to Promote Resilience

Land trusts can promote resilience and help priority species, habitats and resources weather the effects of climate change.

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Introducing Green Infrastructure for Coastal Resilience

Introducing Green Infrastructure for Coastal Resilience is a 1-day course that introduces participants to green infrastructure concepts that play a critical role in making coastal communities more resilient to natural hazards.

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New Resilience Guide Launched

Open Space Institute and its partners have published Conserving Nature in a Changing Climate. This three part guide demonstrates how land protection can strategically increase the chances that natural systems will adapt to climate change. With a basic knowledge of relevant climate science and the tools described in this guide, conservation leaders can both revise their land protection goals if appropriate, and confidently explain to funders, board members, and landowners why their efforts matter now more than ever.

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Coral Bleaching and Reef Degradation

The warmer air and ocean surface temperatures brought on by climate change impact corals and alter coral reef communities by prompting coral bleaching events and altering ocean chemistry. These impacts affect corals and the many organisms that use coral reefs as habitat. Reef degradation also reduces the ability of these systems to respond to change and mitigate storm surge events – a valuable ecosystem service.

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Manage Wildlife for Climate Change Resilience

Climate change has already been linked to changes in wildlife distribution, reproduction and behavior. Enhancing connectivity and “conserving the stage” are critical conservation objectives that can help species adapt to changing conditions.

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The Hawaiian Islands Land Trust – Waihe’e Coastal Dunes and Wetlands Refuge

Sea level rise amplifies hazards such as coastal erosion, inundation due to storm surge, extreme tides, and tsunami, and is projected to lead to more frequent and increasingly severe flooding. To respond to these threats conservation efforts on the 277-acre Waihe’e Coastal Dunes and Wetlands Refuge aim to mitigate impacts of sea level rise, promote habitat restoration, and support food security and community sustainability.

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Coastal Resilience Index

The Coastal Resilience Index tool helps communities examine how prepared they are for storms and storm recovery. To complete the assessment, community leaders can get together and use the tool to guide discussion about their community’s resilience to coastal hazards.

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Building Resilience with Natural Adaptations to Change

Bainbridge Island Land Trust is working with property owners to implement natural adaptation solutions to build more resilient coastal systems. The Powel Shoreline Restoration Project removed shoreline bulkheading to enhance coastal habitats and reduce risks of destructive undercutting, leveraging a failing bulkhead to produce an adaptive win-win solution to adapt to change.

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Case Studies

While unified in their mission to protect the landscapes we love, land trusts across the nation are responding to resource management challenges in various ways. These case studies highlight examples different approaches to achieving strategic conservation planning, building resilience through vulnerability assessments, and adaptation and mitigation projects. Youth education efforts that provide introductory information about climate change that will be necessary for the conservationists of tomorrow are also highlighted. You can also search by region or by using the advanced search option.

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Extreme Temperature Change: Air Temperatures

Average air temperatures are rising. Climate change has already increased average temperatures enough to shift seasons — spring comes earlier and fall frosts arrive later. While average global air temperatures are warming, historical data also reflects that we are also experiencing more extreme temperature change.

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