2019 a Year of Record Setting Rain

As we close out 2019, Climate Central takes a look at the year’s biggest story—record-setting rain. The result: severe costs in damages to property and losses to industry (e.g. agriculture). According to NOAA, the 18 billion-dollar flood events experienced by the U.S this decade have resulted in losses of at least $40 billion.

2020 Snow Report

Snowfall has been decreasing in the spring and fall seasons across much of the U.S. but with clear regional differences.

2020 Vision: Looking Back to Drive Forward

This blog provides an overview of cutting edge Earth science data that has developed over the last decade. NASA continues to develop tools to chart changes on Earth over time periods ranging from days to decades.

A Climate-Smart Framework for Land Trusts

Point Blue’s new climate-smart publication, Integrating Climate Adaptation into Land Conservation – A Climate-Smart Framework for Land Trusts, aims to provide land trusts and other land conservation practitioners with a guide to integrating climate change projections and climate adaptation approaches into the process of private land conservation.

A warming Midwest increases likelihood that farmers will need to irrigate

Warming conditions will necessitate a much greater demand for water in the Midwest, a new study in Ecospheres reports.

Adapting to Climate-Driven Stewardship Challenges

As climate change reshapes ecosystems, land trust staff and volunteers around the country are attempting constructive responses and trying to help landowners adapt and build resiliency.

Annual Rainfall Increasing in Most U.S. States

From 1950 to 2018, average annual precipitation has risen in 90% of the U.S. states analyzed. The great majority of the country has experienced above-average rainfall so far this year – in fact, the last 12 months have been the wettest on record.

Can’t ‘See’ Sea Level Rise? You’re Looking in the Wrong Place

Sea level rise is a global problem. This blog post highlights a key paradox about sea level rise: since it occurs relatively slowly, it can be easy to think it’s not happening. But, if you’re not seeing it, you’re just not looking in the right place.

Climate knowledge for everyone

To support better understanding and action, a new interactive website launched by MIT leads the public through the knowns (and unknowns) of climate change.

Climate Week – Celebrating Journalism

In preparation for Climate Week, taking place this year from September 23 to 29, 2019, Climate Central has compiled tools, tips, and resources for reporting local climate stories and featuring the work of partners who communicate the science and effects of climate change.

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