Search Toolkit

Search Results for: “”

Building Carbon in America’s Farms, Forests, and Grasslands: Foundations for a Policy Roadmap

“Building Carbon in America’s Farms, Forests, and Grasslands: Foundations for a Policy Roadmap” offers new analysis to support long-term planning to enhance U.S. land management of carbon sinks to ensure healthy and productive landscapes contribute to greenhouse gas reduction goals.

More »

Climate Change Impacts to Grasslands

Climate change impacts to grasslands and prairies include increased seasonal, annual, minimum, and maximum temperature and changing precipitation patterns. Because these ecosystems are relatively dry with a strong seasonal climate, they are sensitive to climatic changes and vulnerable to shifts in climatic regime.

More »

Climate Change Resource Center

The United States Forest Service’s (USFS) Climate Change Resource Center (CCRC) is a collection of forest management resources. It includes an extensive library, climate change and carbon tools, webinars and short courses by topic area and ecosystem, as well as an introductory webinar for new users.

More »

Climate Change Talking Points: Prairie Potholes and Grasslands

Understanding the Science of Climate Change Talking Points: Impacts to Prairie Potholes and Grasslands is a USDOI Natural Resource Report that is intended to provide park and refuge area managers and staff with accessible, up-to date information about climate change and climate change impacts to the resources they protect.

More »

Effects of Drought on Forests and Rangelands in the U.S.

“Effects of Drought on Forests and Rangelands in the U.S.” aims to help working land managers understand the impacts of drought and build resilience on their lands. It explains how drought is characterized, drought impacts on forest processes and disturbances such as insect outbreaks and wildfire, and consequences for forest values and management considerations.

More »

Forest and Rangeland Drought – Regional Two-Pagers

Effects of Drought on Forests and Rangelands in the United States: A Comprehensive Science Synthesis covers a wide expanse of management issues. The USDA’s Climate Hubs have synthesized the assessment for each of their region’s stakeholders.

More »

Grasslands, Shrublands, Savannas, and Deserts

Grasslands, also known as prairies, steppes, or savannas, exhibit naturally dominant grass vegetation, typically in areas where there is not enough rainfall to support the growth of a forest but not so little as to form a desert. Deserts are biomes characterized by small amounts of moisture.

More »

Grasslands’ Carbon Storage Value Now Quantified

Grasslands that feature diverse plant species have more carbon storage capacity than less-diverse grasslands, largely because the former produce more biomass, the researchers say.

More »

Manage Grasslands and Prairie Habitats for Climate Change

Grasslands cover approximately 400 million acres of the contiguous United States.Despite their extensive distribution, grasslands and the neighboring deserts that make up more arid regions are sensitive ecosystems that can be vulnerable to extreme changes in temperature and shifts in precipitation. Land trusts are working to manage grasslands for climate change to protect the biodiversity, habitats, and ecosystem services these landscapes provide.

More »

South Kingstown Land Trust – Integrating Adaptation into Conservation Planning

The South Kingstown Land Trust (SKLT)’s vulnerability assessment and resulting conservation planning efforts identify organizational goals, natural resource assets, and management priorities. This iterative adaptive management approach enables the land trust to focus stewardship activities on critical ecosystems while allowing the flexibility to acknowledge uncertainties and revisit results. By integrating climate change adaptation considerations into conservation planning, SKLT is able to address changing environmental conditions using an informed and methodical approach, and to plan future acquisitions and restoration projects based on their stewardship objectives.

More »